Bazaar Review

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Plotline: –

Rizwan Ahmed (Rohan Mehra) is a stock trader, living with his father and sister in Allahabad (now Prayagraj).  Tired of the meagre profit he makes in this small city; he dreams to move to Mumbai to make it big as a stockbroker. After much persuasion, he gets to fulfil his dreams, but at what cost?

 

Positive Points: –

  • Bazaar’s basic plotline is crafted with great intelligence and would seem like a promising film at least on paper.
  • Saif Ali Khan’s performance.
  • In spite of its many shortcomings, this film manages to keep you glued to the screen for almost the whole of its runtime.

 

Negative Points: –

  • The screenplay by Nikhil Advani and co. fails to capitalise the astuteness of the story.
  • Poor direction, cinematography, editing and almost everything on technical terms.
  • One could guess right from the trailers that Bazaar seems to be inspired from Wall Street (not to be confused with The Wolf Of The Wall Street), and sadly, it’s true making its premise highly predictable.

 

The General Aspects: –

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Most Indians, who don’t know about Oliver Stone’s Wall Street, expected Bazaar to be similar to Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street, which is definitely not the case save the breaking of the fourth wall. Though the storyline has its own differences with its Hollywood counterpart, the characters and their sketches were sorts of copy-pasted from the original source. This renders the movie predictable and at times even overpowers the intelligence it attempts to exhibit. Bazaar’s greatest strength lies in its basic plotline which boasts of a lot of incisiveness but the same doesn’t reflect in its screenplay. In an attempt to make the movie grandiloquent, the makers compromise with its smart premise reducing it to a piece of gimcrack with only a few worth catchy dialogues to remember. Even its characters fail to impart any significant strength to it chiefly because they have been created without any ounce of originality. We have seen personalities like them and their behavioural constructs, umpteen number of times on the screen before and as a result, their presence made the movie a whole lot more predictable. If not for its story and a couple of performances, the film couldn’t have been as engrossing as it is and even if it does alleviate itself to a certain extent in the second half, the third act and its rushed ending lessens its cinematic appeal.

 

Performances: –

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Just like in Kaalakaandi, Saif Ali Khan literally carries this film on his shoulders throughout its run. There are many occasions where he could have gone overboard but he seldom does that. He understands the various layers his personality exhibits and depicts each of them convincingly. Debutant Rohan Mehra who should have been at par with Khan comes nowhere close. The problem with him is that he tries a lot to act and the efforts that he puts in are clearly visible to the audience. Although he does act well in a few sequences, his overall act is below-average. Radhika Apte doesn’t have much to do here but she is sterling in her brief stint. Chitrangadha Singh disappoints, for she neither emotes properly nor even makes her presence seem any significant despite her importance in the script.

 

Final Verdict: –

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Bazaar wastes its potential appeal, intriguing nature and Saif Ali Khan’s committed performance to unnecessary commercialisation and poor filmmaking. What could have become one of the best films of the year gets diminished to an average flick which couldn’t do justice to the intellect it once boasted of.

 

RATING: 2.5/5

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